Arnold Schwarzenegger on starring in Stan Lee’s final project and if he’s sore from that drop-kick that went viral

Genius Brands   Superhero Kindergarten 2

  • Arnold Schwarzenegger will star in his first-ever animated show when he voices the lead character in “Stan Lee’s Superhero Kindergarten.”
  • On Tuesday, Lee’s POW! Entertainment and Genius Brands International announced the launch of the series, which marks the last project Lee created before his death last year.
  • Schwarzenegger plays Arnold Armstrong, a former superhero who, after decades defending the world, is now working undercover as a kindergarten teacher who is tasked with teaching 5-year-olds with newly discovered super powers how to use them for good when they grow up.
  • Lee came up with the idea from his love for “Kindergarten Cop” and conversations with Schwarzenegger in which the actor said he wanted to do more kid-friendly projects. 
  • Business Insider spoke with Schwarzenegger about the animated series, plus his excitement about doing another Terminator movie, and that video of him being drop-kicked that went viral.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

Arnold Schwarzenegger built his career on being the biggest and baddest action hero on the planet, and though he is still The Terminator (he stars in “Terminator: Dark Fate” later this year), the 71-year-old is now showing his softer side by being the face of Stan Lee’s last project.

On Tuesday, Lee’s POW! Entertainment announced the launch of the action-adventure animated series, “Stan Lee’s Superhero Kindergarten.” In it, Schwarzenegger plays Arnold Armstrong, a former superhero who, after decades defending the world, is now working undercover as a kindergarten teacher who is tasked with teaching 5-year-olds with newly discovered super powers how to use them for good when they grow up.

If it sounds a little like Schwarzenegger’s 1990 classic “Kindergarten Cop,” it’s because that’s how Lee got the idea for the show. After numerous talks Lee had with Schwarzenegger, in which the actor opened up about wanting to do something kid-focused, the mind behind such iconic Marvel characters as Spider-Man and the Hulk created the series before his death in 2018.

“Superhero Kindergarten” currently does not have a deal with any network or streaming company to air it, but there should be interest, as along with names like Schwarzenegger (who is also a coexecutive producer) and Lee attached, it has cocreator of “Deadpool,” Fabian Nicieza, scripting the series and Genius Brands International — which is behind the Baby Genius brand, “Llama Llama” on Netflix, and “Rainbow Rangers” on Nick Jr. — coproducing with Lee’s POW!

Business Insider spoke with Schwarzenegger about doing something geared toward kids for the first time in his career, as well as why “Terminator: Dark Fate” will get his beloved franchise back on track, and his reaction to that surprise drop-kick he got while attending his sports festival in South Africa

Jason Guerrasio: Before we get into “Superhero Kindergarten,” I have to know: Any after-effects from that drop-kick that went viral?

Arnold Schwarzenegger: To me, it’s still kind of stunning. I thought some kid kind of tripped and fell onto me or something like that. I almost didn’t feel it, it was kind of a push. And since then, everywhere I go people are asking if I’m okay. Thousands of people are writing to me. It’s pretty crazy the way this stuff works. 

Guerrasio: It’s never a dull moment for you.

Schwarzenegger: But if I would get that kind of attention for fighting, say, gerrymandering I would be happier. 

Guerrasio: So you and Stan Lee got to talk about “Superhero Kindergarten” before his passing, right?

Schwarzenegger: Oh yeah, years before his passing. It was a coincidence. We would get together every so often and talk about ideas and projects. And he asked me, “What is your ultimate dream project?” And I said beside doing more “Conan” and “Terminator” movies, the movie that I always wanted to do a sequel of was “Kindergarten Cop.” And he said that he loved that movie. I told him I would love to do more shows for the kids.

Stan + ArnoldIt was always difficult for me. When I was the action hero in the ’80s and ’90s, they wouldn’t allow me to do any comedy or anything for kids. They were like, “No, we know we are going to make money with you if you do action movies.” So literally for “Twins” I took no salary, I just wanted to give it a shot. And it just happened to be my first movie to make $100 million domestic. So they realized that it works, Schwarzenegger can cross over. 

So I told Stan that story, and that I was always frustrated that I couldn’t do more kids shows and cross over more. And there was a look in his eyes. I could see him daydreaming for a few seconds. 

Guerrasio: The wheels were turning.

Schwarzenegger: Exactly. But he basically said, “Let me think about that, maybe I can come up with something.” And that was it. And then I didn’t hear anything for a long while and one day he called me back and he said, “I have an idea that’s exactly what you’re talking about, but how about putting my spin on it?” And I said, “What’s that?” And he went, “Arnold, c’mon, you know, superheroes!” And he told me how I would play someone that no one knows was a superhero and I’m a teacher, just like in “Kindergarten Cop,” but my kindergarteners have super powers and they are going to grow up and be the protectors of the planet. My character has to teach them all the important lessons. I told him it was fantastic, and he said, “Well, you’re talking to Stan Lee.” [Laughs.] 

It was crazy Stan passed away and didn’t see this last idea that he had really flourish. So we now have to do it justice. 

Genius Brands   Superhero Kindergarten Artwork 1_edited 1

Guerrasio: I was thinking back, is this the first time you’ve done an animated show?

Schwarzenegger: It’s the first time I’ve done a TV animated show, the whole show. It’s also the first time that I’ve done something that is directly for kids. Most of my comedies are kind of geared to adults too, like “Twins,” “Kindergarten Cop,” “Christmas in Connecticut” (which Schwarzenegger directed), “Jingle All the Way,” “Junior.” This is specifically for the kids audience. 

Guerrasio: Though you haven’t been able to do a lot of kids-focused projects, you have had a focus on physical fitness for the youth going all the way back to H.W. Bush being in office. With your decades of knowledge, what does a show like this need to get through to not just kids but adults about the need for their kids to be active and not always on devices and playing games?

Schwarzenegger: That’s what George Herbert Bush was talking about, “the couch potatoes,” and how do we get the family as a whole off the couch? So this show will be about fitness but it will also have action and discipline, being inclusive, different things that I stand for. Teaching them how to use their powers for good. Indirectly there will be a message, but it will be very entertaining.

It’s like when James Cameron did the second “Terminator” movie, he didn’t go and say this will promote women power, he wrote it that way and by the end you could tell that Sarah Connor was the force that beat the Terminator. So you can get a message across without forcing it down people’s throats. 

Read more: The Elton John biopic “Rocketman” is a worthy celebration of his music and a look at his troubled past

Guerrasio: And it sounds like Stan Lee is going to make a cameo in every episode?

Schwarzenegger: Yes. 

Guerrasio: How did that work? Did he do the voice work before he died?

Schwarzenegger: Well, as you know it’s a tradition in the Marvel movies of him showing up, and sometimes you needed to see it a few times to realize that was Stan in the background. So that’s how this is going to be. He wanted his appearances here for this to be very subtle. 

terminator dark fate paramount

Guerrasio: Last we talked you said that the interest in still doing The Terminator character all these years later is its vulnerability when facing the newer forms of Terminators. Will that vulnerability be present in “Dark Fate”?

Schwarzenegger: You will see it. But I don’t want to get too much into that at this point. I think the studio has learned from the last time that they gave too much away of the story, so they want to keep it more under wraps this time around. What I will say is I play a great T-800 again and it was fun to have Linda Hamilton back. The new team was willing to do the work in preparing. They worked their asses off in the gym, I helped them with their training, a lot of them. I was happy the trailer that came out had a huge impact and people responded positively.

Guerrasio: And James Cameron is back as a producer!

Schwarzenegger: Cameron was a fanatic about this. He wanted to make sure we were bringing it in the right direction. He’s a control freak. 

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 16 clues that foreshadowed Arya’s big moment at the battle of Winterfell in ‘Game of Thrones’

Arnold Schwarzenegger built his career on being the biggest and baddest action hero on the planet, and though he is still The Terminator (he stars in “Terminator: Dark Fate” later this year), the 71-year-old is now showing his softer side by being the face of Stan Lee’s last project.

On Tuesday, Lee’s POW! Entertainment announced the launch of the action-adventure animated series, “Stan Lee’s Superhero Kindergarten.” In it, Schwarzenegger plays Arnold Armstrong, a former superhero who, after decades defending the world, is now working undercover as a kindergarten teacher who is tasked with teaching 5-year-olds with newly discovered super powers how to use them for good when they grow up.

If it sounds a little like Schwarzenegger’s 1990 classic “Kindergarten Cop,” it’s because that’s how Lee got the idea for the show. After numerous talks Lee had with Schwarzenegger, in which the actor opened up about wanting to do something kid-focused, the mind behind such iconic Marvel characters as Spider-Man and the Hulk created the series before his death in 2018.

“Superhero Kindergarten” currently does not have a deal with any network or streaming company to air it, but there should be interest, as along with names like Schwarzenegger (who is also a coexecutive producer) and Lee attached, it has cocreator of “Deadpool,” Fabian Nicieza, scripting the series and Genius Brands International — which is behind the Baby Genius brand, “Llama Llama” on Netflix, and “Rainbow Rangers” on Nick Jr. — coproducing with Lee’s POW!

Business Insider spoke with Schwarzenegger about doing something geared toward kids for the first time in his career, as well as why “Terminator: Dark Fate” will get his beloved franchise back on track, and his reaction to that surprise drop-kick he got while attending his sports festival in South Africa.

Jason Guerrasio: Before we get into “Superhero Kindergarten,” I have to know: Any after-effects from that drop-kick that went viral?

Arnold Schwarzenegger: To me, it’s still kind of stunning. I thought some kid kind of tripped and fell onto me or something like that. I almost didn’t feel it, it was kind of a push. And since then, everywhere I go people are asking if I’m okay. Thousands of people are writing to me. It’s pretty crazy the way this stuff works.

Guerrasio: It’s never a dull moment for you.

Schwarzenegger: But if I would get that kind of attention for fighting, say, gerrymandering I would be happier.

Guerrasio: So you and Stan Lee got to talk about “Superhero Kindergarten” before his passing, right?

Schwarzenegger: Oh yeah, years before his passing. It was a coincidence. We would get together every so often and talk about ideas and projects. And he asked me, “What is your ultimate dream project?” And I said beside doing more “Conan” and “Terminator” movies, the movie that I always wanted to do a sequel of was “Kindergarten Cop.” And he said that he loved that movie. I told him I would love to do more shows for the kids.

(L-R) Stan Lee and Arnold Schwarzenegger.
POW! Entertainment

It was always difficult for me. When I was the action hero in the ’80s and ’90s, they wouldn’t allow me to do any comedy or anything for kids. They were like, “No, we know we are going to make money with you if you do action movies.” So literally for “Twins” I took no salary, I just wanted to give it a shot. And it just happened to be my first movie to make $100 million domestic. So they realized that it works, Schwarzenegger can cross over.

So I told Stan that story, and that I was always frustrated that I couldn’t do more kids shows and cross over more. And there was a look in his eyes. I could see him daydreaming for a few seconds.

Guerrasio: The wheels were turning.

Schwarzenegger: Exactly. But he basically said, “Let me think about that, maybe I can come up with something.” And that was it. And then I didn’t hear anything for a long while and one day he called me back and he said, “I have an idea that’s exactly what you’re talking about, but how about putting my spin on it?” And I said, “What’s that?” And he went, “Arnold, c’mon, you know, superheroes!” And he told me how I would play someone that no one knows was a superhero and I’m a teacher, just like in “Kindergarten Cop,” but my kindergarteners have super powers and they are going to grow up and be the protectors of the planet. My character has to teach them all the important lessons. I told him it was fantastic, and he said, “Well, you’re talking to Stan Lee.” [ Laughs.]

It was crazy Stan passed away and didn’t see this last idea that he had really flourish. So we now have to do it justice.

“Superhero Kindergarten.”
Genius Brands International

Guerrasio: I was thinking back, is this the first time you’ve done an animated show?

Schwarzenegger: It’s the first time I’ve done a TV animated show, the whole show. It’s also the first time that I’ve done something that is directly for kids. Most of my comedies are kind of geared to adults too, like “Twins,” “Kindergarten Cop,” “Christmas in Connecticut” (which Schwarzenegger directed), “Jingle All the Way,” “Junior.” This is specifically for the kids audience.

Guerrasio: Though you haven’t been able to do a lot of kids-focused projects, you have had a focus on physical fitness for the youth going all the way back to H.W. Bush being in office. With your decades of knowledge, what does a show like this need to get through to not just kids but adults about the need for their kids to be active and not always on devices and playing games?

Schwarzenegger: That’s what George Herbert Bush was talking about, “the couch potatoes,” and how do we get the family as a whole off the couch? So this show will be about fitness but it will also have action and discipline, being inclusive, different things that I stand for. Teaching them how to use their powers for good. Indirectly there will be a message, but it will be very entertaining.

It’s like when James Cameron did the second “Terminator” movie, he didn’t go and say this will promote women power, he wrote it that way and by the end you could tell that Sarah Connor was the force that beat the Terminator. So you can get a message across without forcing it down people’s throats.

Read more: The Elton John biopic “Rocketman” is a worthy celebration of his music and a look at his troubled past

Guerrasio: And it sounds like Stan Lee is going to make a cameo in every episode?

Schwarzenegger: Yes.

Guerrasio: How did that work? Did he do the voice work before he died?

Schwarzenegger: Well, as you know it’s a tradition in the Marvel movies of him showing up, and sometimes you needed to see it a few times to realize that was Stan in the background. So that’s how this is going to be. He wanted his appearances here for this to be very subtle.

Arnold Schwarzenegger as The Terminator in “Terminator: Dark Fate.”
Paramount

Guerrasio: Last we talked you said that the interest in still doing The Terminator character all these years later is its vulnerability when facing the newer forms of Terminators. Will that vulnerability be present in “Dark Fate”?

Schwarzenegger: You will see it. But I don’t want to get too much into that at this point. I think the studio has learned from the last time that they gave too much away of the story, so they want to keep it more under wraps this time around. What I will say is I play a great T-800 again and it was fun to have Linda Hamilton back. The new team was willing to do the work in preparing. They worked their asses off in the gym, I helped them with their training, a lot of them. I was happy the trailer that came out had a huge impact and people responded positively.

Guerrasio: And James Cameron is back as a producer!

Schwarzenegger: Cameron was a fanatic about this. He wanted to make sure we were bringing it in the right direction. He’s a control freak.

Sammy Singh

Graduate of UCLA and Wharton School of Business and Media Personality. World renowned global entrepreneur, venture capitalist, financial technology professional, tax specialist, marketing mogul, and more! Connect with me at: www.linkedin.com/in/cfo www.instagram.com/champagnegqpapi www.facebook.com/sammysinghcxo www.twitter.com/cxosynergy

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Neil Gaiman on the emotional making of Amazon's 'Good Omens' and keeping 'the promise that I made to my friend who died' (AMZN)

Wed May 29 , 2019
<div><p><img src="https://static5.businessinsider.com/image/5ced715311e2050ce145c405-2400/good-omens-creators-cast.jpg" border="0" alt="Good Omens cast and crew" data-mce-source="Corey Nickols/Getty Images" data-mce-caption="&quotGood Omens&quot producers Neil Gaiman and Douglas Mackinnon, with stars Michael Sheen and David Tennant."></p><p></p> <ul class="summary-list"><li>Cult fantasy author Neil Gaiman is debuting his most personal project to date, the series "Good Omens," on Amazon on May 31. </li> <li>The TV adaptation of the 1990 novel fulfills a promise that Gaiman made to his "Good Omens" cowriter, the late Terry Pratchett, to turn their beloved book into a TV show. </li> <li>Gaiman served as a showrunner on the series — a first for him after more than two decades working in TV and film — so he could control the elements of the book that went into the show.</li> <li>"I'm going to make a 'Good Omens' for Terry that Terry would love," Gaiman told Business Insider.</li> <li>The production involved two years of script writing on Gaiman's part, 120 days of filming with more than 200 speaking parts, and a laborious 11 months of post-production. </li> <li><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/?hprecirc-bullet"><span>Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.</span></a></li> </ul><p>Cult fantasy author Neil Gaiman is one of the most-adapted contemporary authors with at least six TV shows and movies based on his literary works, such as the movie, "Coraline," and the TV shows "American Gods" and "Lucifer."</p> <p>His latest mini-series, called "Good Omens," was his most complex and personal adaption, Gaiman told Business Insider, in an interview alongside series director Douglas Mackinnon.</p> <p>"Good Omens," which debuts on Amazon on May 31, is a fantasy series about the Antichrist who brings the end of the world, based on the 1990 novel by Gaiman and the late Terry Pratchett. It's one of the most ambitious projects to premiere from Amazon Studios, which is working on bigger, genre series including a "The Lord of the Rings" TV show. The production was also emotional for Gaiman, who adapted the book — which centers on an angel and a demon who are best friends — to fulfill the last wish of his friend, Pratchett. The author died in 2015, before "Good Omens" was picked up by coproducers Amazon and BBC Studios.</p> <p><img src="https://static2.businessinsider.com/image/5ced702c11e20510e544abd4-2400/good-omens-amazon.jpg" border="0" alt="Good Omens on Amazon" data-mce-source="Chris Raphael/Amazon" data-mce-caption="The angel, Aziraphale, and demon, Crowley, in Amazon's 'Good Omens.'"></p> <p>"I got to make something incredibly personal," Gaiman said. "I got to take the biggest thing the BBC Studios has made, the biggest thing on Amazon today, and come through on the promise that I made to my friend who died that I would make a television show that he would like and be proud of."</p> <h2>Making a TV adaption that stays faithful to the book</h2> <p>Gaiman, who wrote and executive produced the series, also served as the showrunner — a first for him over more than two decades of writing for and working in TV and film. He oversaw every piece of the production, from budgeting to post-production, so that he could control the elements of the book that went into or were cut from the series.</p> <p>"He wanted to see it before he died," Gaiman said of Pratchett. "Then he died. So I'm going to make a 'Good Omens' for Terry that Terry would love."</p> <p>Amazon — which produced "Good Omens" along with BBC Studios, Gaiman's The Blank Corporation, and Pratchett's Narrativia — backed Gaiman's vision for the version of "Good Omens" that Pratchett would've wanted to see, Gaiman said.</p> <p>Gaiman and Mackinnon usually treat TV and film adaptions as different beasts than the books they are based on. "You're making something else," Mackinnon, who has directed episodes of TV adaptations including "Outlander" and "Sherlock," said. "You have to admit that."</p> <p>But, with "Good Omens," Gaiman did not want to compromise. The TV show stays true to the novel. Gaiman, Mackinnon, and the rest of the cast and crew committed to bringing the version of the book that Pratchett would have wanted to life, with its quirky characters and casual cups of tea in between plot points.</p> <p>"I'm not sure if the word adaptation actually covers it," Mackinnon said. "We just made 'Good Omens.' It's like 'Good Omens' Plus."</p> <h2>Behind the scenes on the making of "Good Omens"</h2> <p>The production started with Gaiman, who wrote the entire series himself. "For the first two years, it was basically me and a copy of the novel," he said.</p> <p>In 2017, after Gaiman had the six scripts and the series was picked up by BBC Studios and Amazon Studios, the show went into pre-production. Gaiman and Mackinnon had only a couple of months for pre-production, a fraction of what they should have had, Mackinnon said, because the show's all-star cast was only available for a tight window. Michael Sheen, David Tennant, Jon Hamm, Miranda Richardson, Nick Offerman, Frances McDormand, and Benedict Cumberbatch were in the series. There were more than 200 speaking parts overall.</p> <p>"Good Omens" started shooting in London in September 2017, and filmed for a total of 120 days.</p> <p>Post-production, which Mackinnon called the hardest post-production process he's ever been a part of, took about 11 months. Gaiman and Mackinnon sat side by side in a London studio, staring at screens day in and day out, while overseeing the editing and visual effects.</p> <p>Some days started at six in the morning with pickups, or scenes shot after principal photography to flush out the production, and ran until 10 at night or later. Others started at 8 a.m. and went on until 2 a.m. the following day. Those days involved editing and coordinating with actors — who, by that point, were all over the world working on other projects — on looping, or replacing the dialogue in scenes. Gaiman or Mackinnon might nod off during those long nights, and the other would take control.</p> <p>"It was a fatal flaw and our grand plan for the two of us just to do it together," Mackinnon said. Series usually have more than one director and several producers, he said. "But, if 'Good Omens' is distinctive at all, that's because we did it. The very thing that is the tough thing is the original thing."</p> <p><em><strong>Read more</strong>: <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/new-york-times-talks-prestige-tv-hulu-show-the-weekly-2019-5">'This is a big swing': A New York Times exec explains the company's push into prestige TV that starts with 'The Weekly' on FX and Hulu</a></em></p> <p>On Friday, the series, which has gotten <a href="https://www.rottentomatoes.com/tv/good_omens/s01">positive reviews from a solid share of critics</a>, premieres on Amazon — six months before it airs weekly on BBC Two. It brings to an end Gaiman's years-long journey to make "Good Omens."</p> <p>Two hundred and fifty members of the cast and crew reunited in London on Sunday to screen all six episodes of the finished product, many months after their involvement in the series wrapped. Gaiman and Mackinnon consider it a testament to how much the production touched those who worked on it.  </p> <p>"It's a bit dreamlike actually, a bit unreal," Gaiman said of Friday's series premiere. "We did it and that feels amazing."</p><p><strong>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/inside-new-york-times-deal-tv-show-fx-hulu-2019-5">Inside The New York Times' unique deal with FX and Hulu for its TV show, 'The Weekly,' which could be a blueprint for others in the industry</a></strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/neil-gaiman-making-amazon-good-omens-series-2019-5#comments">Join the conversation about this story »</a></p> <p>NOW WATCH: <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/game-of-thrones-arya-kills-night-king-battle-of-winterfell-season-8-episode-3-2019-5">16 clues that foreshadowed Arya's big moment at the battle of Winterfell in 'Game of Thrones'</a></p><div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?a=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?i=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?a=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?a=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:bcOpcFrp8Mo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?d=bcOpcFrp8Mo" border="0"></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?a=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:gIN9vFwOqvQ"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?i=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:gIN9vFwOqvQ" border="0"></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?a=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:cGdyc7Q-1BI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?d=cGdyc7Q-1BI" border="0"></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?a=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:QXVau8BzmBE"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?d=QXVau8BzmBE" border="0"></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?a=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></a> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?a=3ygqt84skgA:2bAvMAxVxqQ:7Q72WNTAKBA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider?d=7Q72WNTAKBA" border="0"></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/typepad/alleyinsider/silicon_alley_insider/~4/3ygqt84skgA" height="1" width="1" alt=""></div>
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