Nike, Converse, and Salomon Have Sneaker Drops to Check Out Right Now

It’s the end of the work week, and that means a fresh batch of new sneaker drops is upon us. There are plenty of white-hot sneaker releases, including a collaboration between the biggest name in basketball and a GQ favorite designer. (That’d LeBron James and John Elliot, respectively.) There’s also a duo of shoes from the masters of hi-tech Salomon and Parisian retailer The Broken Arm. Plus, a pair of perfectly off-kilter sneakers from Converse and Takahiro Miyashita The Soloist. If you’re looking to add some fresh new kicks to your rotation for summer, now is the time to do it. Here are the three sneaker drops worth checking out.

Nike LeBron x John Elliott Icon

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Nike LeBron x John Elliott Icon

Nike (releases May 25)

$250

Buy Now

The latest sneaker in the ongoing collaboration between basketball legend LeBron James and beloved designer John Elliott is finally here. This time, the shoe gets an all-black colorway, complete with the LeBron 8’s full-length Air tooling and a unique translucent upper featuring court-inspired embroidery. It’s a LeBron sneaker that’s a little low-key but will still look just as stylish on you as it does the man himself.

Salomon x The Broken Arm

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Salomon x The Broken Arm Trail Pro

The Broken Arm

$182

Buy Now

Salomon, the Italian mountaineering brand behind the ultra-technical sneakers that have been widely embraced by menswear’s inner circle, has teamed up with the French boutique The Broken Arm yet again. The brand’s Trail Pro model gets a sleek colorway of brown and beige with pops of lime green. (A weird combination of colors that sounds odd on paper but looks excellent in execution.) The duo also teamed up on a version of Salomon’s RX Slide, a half-sneaker half-sandal that’s fashion-forward and dad-like in just the right ways.

Converse x Takahiro Miyashita The Soloist

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Converse x TheSoloist Jack Purcell Zip Low Top

Converse

$110

Buy Now

This is the second collaborative collection from Converse and designer Takahiro Miyashita’s The Soloist. Miyashita has taken the sneaker brand’s iconic Jack Purcell and given it his trademark left-of-center touch. That means mismatched graphic patterns, vertical utility zippers, and asymmetrical lacing. All in, it’s the perfect mix of timeless and weird—just the type of sneaker that will be a worthy addition to any closet.

It’s the end of the work week, and that means a fresh batch of new sneaker drops is upon us. There are plenty of white-hot sneaker releases, including a collaboration between the biggest name in basketball and a GQ favorite designer. (That’d LeBron James and John Elliot, respectively.) There’s also a duo of shoes from the masters of hi-tech Salomon and Parisian retailer The Broken Arm. Plus, a pair of perfectly off-kilter sneakers from Converse and Takahiro Miyashita The Soloist. If you’re looking to add some fresh new kicks to your rotation for summer, now is the time to do it. Here are the three sneaker drops worth checking out.

Nike LeBron x John Elliott Icon

product image

Nike LeBron x John Elliott Icon

Nike (releases May 25)
$250

Buy Now

The latest sneaker in the ongoing collaboration between basketball legend LeBron James and beloved designer John Elliott is finally here. This time, the shoe gets an all-black colorway, complete with the LeBron 8’s full-length Air tooling and a unique translucent upper featuring court-inspired embroidery. It’s a LeBron sneaker that’s a little low-key but will still look just as stylish on you as it does the man himself.

Salomon x The Broken Arm

product image

Salomon x The Broken Arm Trail Pro

The Broken Arm
$182

Buy Now

Salomon, the Italian mountaineering brand behind the ultra-technical sneakers that have been widely embraced by menswear’s inner circle, has teamed up with the French boutique The Broken Arm yet again. The brand’s Trail Pro model gets a sleek colorway of brown and beige with pops of lime green. (A weird combination of colors that sounds odd on paper but looks excellent in execution.) The duo also teamed up on a version of Salomon’s RX Slide, a half-sneaker half-sandal that’s fashion-forward and dad-like in just the right ways.

Converse x Takahiro Miyashita The Soloist

product image

Converse x TheSoloist Jack Purcell Zip Low Top

Converse
$110

Buy Now

This is the second collaborative collection from Converse and designer Takahiro Miyashita’s The Soloist. Miyashita has taken the sneaker brand’s iconic Jack Purcell and given it his trademark left-of-center touch. That means mismatched graphic patterns, vertical utility zippers, and asymmetrical lacing. All in, it’s the perfect mix of timeless and weird—just the type of sneaker that will be a worthy addition to any closet.

Sammy Singh

Graduate of UCLA and Wharton School of Business and Media Personality. World renowned global entrepreneur, venture capitalist, financial technology professional, tax specialist, marketing mogul, and more! Connect with me at: www.linkedin.com/in/cfo www.instagram.com/champagnegqpapi www.facebook.com/sammysinghcxo www.twitter.com/cxosynergy

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Rei Kawakubo Just Wants Us To Do Our Best

Thu May 23 , 2019
<div><p><strong>Rei Kawakubo: “I don’t think I have that much in common with Ralph Lauren.”</strong></p> <p>If you’re reading this, Rei Kawakubo is probably your personal god, the deity you pray to at night as you fall into your gentle slumber punctuated by dreams of avant-garde clothing you hope to one day own.</p> <p>That means you must read High Priestess of the Designer Q&A Bridget Foley’s interview with Kawakubo, a 45-minute tour de force on the occasion of the Comme des Garcons’ designer’s reception of an award at the Noguchi Museum in Queens. Any interview with Kawakubo is always a process of course correction—the interviewer suggests, proposes, and pushes, and Kawakubo, speaking through her husband and translator, Adrian Joffe, carefully reshapes their ideas. Like: Foley asks whether Kawakubo’s most recent womenswear collection, in which models in black gathered in a circle, was a reference to “Salem and the idea of a witches’ coven.” And Kawakubo replies, “No. It just looked like that.” Which is both the simplest answer and the most complex one of all! She refers to lots of things as accidents: her famous perfume, her first job in the fashion industry, even her career as “a designer.”</p> <p>The whole process isn’t <em>rude</em>, though—Kawakubo is simply adamant about the purity of her ideas. Take her pristine response to Foley’s question about what she shares with Ralph Lauren, who’s <em>also</em> been at the helm of his business for half a century: “I don’t think I have that much in common with Ralph Lauren.” Print that on a T-shirt (with a little Comme heart)! A few minutes later, speaking about her creative process, which is the kind of topic that might require cerebral and deeply technical reflection, as a “daily grind.” <em>And yet!!!</em> When Foley asks her whether it’s a great time for fashion, she replies that “we just have to do our best…. Because without that kind of search for creation, there can be no progress in humanity.”</p> <p><strong>Brooks Brothers Has So Many Ways To Wear Sweaters</strong></p> <p>Summer is just heating up, which means it’s time to tie your sweater in a hundred different ways. That’s the news from Brooks Brothers, at least, which had its Fall/Winter 2019 show in Tokyo on Thursday. The show of 61 looks featured sweaters styled in ways both instinctive and baroque, from “literally as a sweater, with your arms through the sleeves etc.,” to around your neck like a scarf, tied across the chest (aka the “skater bow”), and even one around your neck and one around your waist. Two sweaters at once: the prep revival sinks its teeth in further to punctuate the very heart of functional fashion.</p> <figure class="asset-embed"><span class="responsive-asset asset-embed__responsive-asset responsive-asset--invisible"><picture class="responsive-image asset-embed__responsive-asset"><noscript> <p><img alt="2019 Brooks Brothers Japan Look 5" class="responsive-image__image" src="https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80ff01f8a4e5a3fddad18/master/w_1600%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525205.jpg" srcset="https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80ff01f8a4e5a3fddad18/master/w_1600%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525205.jpg 1600w, https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80ff01f8a4e5a3fddad18/master/w_1280%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525205.jpg 1280w, https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80ff01f8a4e5a3fddad18/master/w_1024%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525205.jpg 1024w, https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80ff01f8a4e5a3fddad18/master/w_768%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525205.jpg 768w, https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80ff01f8a4e5a3fddad18/master/w_640%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525205.jpg 640w" sizes="(min-width: 1600px) 800px, (min-width: 1024px) 50vw, 100vw"></p> </noscript></picture></span> <figcaption class="caption asset-embed__caption"><span class="caption__credit">Brooks Brothers Japan</span></figcaption></figure><figure class="asset-embed"><span class="responsive-asset asset-embed__responsive-asset responsive-asset--invisible"><picture class="responsive-image asset-embed__responsive-asset"><noscript> <p><img alt="2019 Brooks Brothers Japan Look 8" class="responsive-image__image" src="https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80feebacbf2840c21c0d8/master/w_1600%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525208.jpg" srcset="https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80feebacbf2840c21c0d8/master/w_1600%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525208.jpg 1600w, https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80feebacbf2840c21c0d8/master/w_1280%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525208.jpg 1280w, https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80feebacbf2840c21c0d8/master/w_1024%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525208.jpg 1024w, https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80feebacbf2840c21c0d8/master/w_768%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525208.jpg 768w, https://media.gq.com/photos/5ce80feebacbf2840c21c0d8/master/w_640%2Cc_limit/2019%252520Brooks%252520Brothers%252520Japan%252520Look%2525208.jpg 640w" sizes="(min-width: 1600px) 800px, (min-width: 1024px) 50vw, 100vw"></p> </noscript></picture></span> <figcaption class="caption asset-embed__caption"><span class="caption__credit">Brooks Brothers Japan</span></figcaption></figure><p><strong>“Tailored Clothing” Is Making “a Comeback”</strong></p> <p>Streetwear, like a train without coal, or a pot of water without a flame beneath it, or something else that proves I took a science class, is “losing steam.” In its place, says WWD, is “a more dressed-up aesthetic.” Did the men’s lacrosse team write this???</p></div>
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